CIP Program Steps

Typical Tank Program Typical Line Program
Step   Step Description
  1. Stand-By
  2. Fill Water Tank 
  3. 1st Pre-Rinse     
  4. Return Flow Check
  5. Complete 1st Pre-Rinse
  6. 1st Pre-Rinse Drain
  7. 2nd Pre-Rinse
  8. 2nd Pre-Rinse Drain
  9. 3rd Pre-Rinse
  10. 3rd Pre-Rinse Drain
  11. System Fill
  12. Establish Recirculation
  13. Heat and Alkalai Feed
  14. Delay to Temperature
  15. Alkali Conductivity Check
  16. Alkalai Wash
  17. Air-Blow and Drain
  18. Alkalai Wash Drain
  19. 1st Post-Rinse
  20. 1st Post-Rinse Drain
  21. 2nd Post-Rinse
  22. 2nd Post-Rinse Drain
  23. System Fill
  24. Establish Recirculation
  25. Acid Feed and (Optional Heat)
  26. Delay to Temperature
  27. Acid Conductivity Check
  28. Acid Rinse (Optional Wash with Heat)
  29. Air-Blow and Drain
  30. Acid Rinse (Wash) Drain
  31. Post Acid Rinse
  32. Post Acid Rinse Drain
  33. Rinse to Resitivity
  34. Check Resitivity
  35. Air-Blow and Drain
  36. Circuit Drain
  37. CIP Program Complete
Step   Step Description
  1. Stand-By
  2. Fill Water Tank 
  3. Pre-Rinse     
  4. Return Flow Check
  5. Complete 1st Pre-Rinse
  6. Establish Recirculation
  7. System Fill (Check and/or complete)
  8. Heat and Alkalai Feed
  9. Delay to Temperature
  10. Alkali Conductivity Check
  11. Alkalai Wash
  12. Air-Blow and Drain
  13. Alkalai Wash Drain
  14. Post Rinse
  15. Establish Recirculation
  16. System Fill (Check and/or complete)
  17. Acid Feed and (Optional Heat)
  18. Delay to Temperature
  19. Acid Conductivity Check
  20. Acid Rinse (Optional Wash with Heat)
  21. Post Acid Rinse
  22. Rinse to Resitivity
  23. Check Resitivity
  24. Air-Blow and Drain
  25. Circuit Drain
  26. CIP Program Complete

Significant Differences Between Tank and Line Circuits

(1) Lines can be rinsed in one continuous step and require no “burst” rinses and drains to minimize water use. Approximately 1-1/2 times the volume of the circuit will accomplish all that can be rinsed with water, except for the final Rinse to Resitivity which may reach 5-7 times the volume of the circuit, depending upon the number and size of dead-legs in the piping. Dead legs can only be rinsed by dilution, either continuous, or repetitive filling and emptying. See Ask Dale.

(2) The most effective use of water for Line circuits is accomplished when the transistion from Rinse to Recirculate involves only closing the Drain Valve and establishing recycle to the Solution Tank.

(3) There is no need for an Air-Blow between the Alkali Wash and the subsequent Post Rinse for Lines. Simply stop recycle, open the Drain valve and push the alkali solution out with the initial portion of the Rinse.

(4) Repeat (3) for the transition to an Acid Rinse or Wash (with Heat) step.

(5) There is no need for an Air-Blow between the Acid Rinse or Wash and the subsequent Post Rinse or Rinse to Resitivity for Lines. Simply stop recycle, open the Drain valve and push the previous solution out with the initial portion of the Rinse.

(3) There is a need for an Air-Blow at the end of the CIP Program to totally evacuate the circuit.